DIY Reusable Food Wraps/Fabric Beeswax Wraps

Creating your own fabric beeswax/reusable wraps is easy and a great way of re-purposing unwanted cotton fabric.

If you are unsure as to what beeswax wraps are, checkout my post What Are Beeswax / Reusable Wraps And Why Do I need them?

If not then lets get started!

There are multiple methods of essentially creating the same thing. Some people prefer to use pine resin, others not, some use jojoba oil, but coconut oil can also be used. Beeswax can be bought and grated or beeswax pellets can be used. One thing everyone needs however is fabric and beeswax!

What Do You Need To Make Beeswax Wraps

  • Fabric 100% cotton is best a fine weave sheet type thickness. I used part of an old sheet and part of a cotton blouse that was beyond repair.
  • Beeswax
  • Jojoba oil or Coconut oil
  • Pine resin (optional)
  • Parchment or baking paper
  • Dedicated paint brush (optional)
  • A heat source – oven, sandwich press or iron.

Fabric Preparation

  • Wash your fabric, roughly 1 meter square is more than enough.
  • Using pinking shears if you have them, cut your fabric into squares roughly handkerchief size, if you want some circles draw around a plate and cut, if you would like some bigger pieces make them larger.

Method 1 – Ready Made Wax Blocks

If it’s your first time or you don’t want the expense of buying different items you may not use again then Ready Made Wax Blocks might be for you. I hadn’t seen them locally so purchased mine via amazon . The beauty of these is that no mixing is required so they can go straight onto the fabric. The block I used was a mix of Pure Natural Beeswax, Tree Resin and Jojoba Oil.

  • Prepare the area for the use of an iron. I used a thick towel covered with parchment/baking paper. Cut a 2nd piece of parchment/baking paper to fit the same area and bigger than the piece of fabric so no seeping onto the towel or iron.
  • Put iron on a medium to high setting
  • Place a piece of your cut fabric onto the paper
  • Cut or grate a small amount of the beeswax directly onto the fabric
  • Cover the fabric & wax with the 2nd piece of parchment/baking paper.
  • Gently Iron over the area. The beeswax should melt easily into the fabric. (be careful no excess wax seeps out of the sides and onto your iron).
  • Remove iron and peel back the paper. The wax should have melted and soaked the fabric. If not fold the fabric onto itself with tongs or fingertips (being very careful it will be hot) then replace the paper over the top and heat again with the iron.
  • If too dry add more beeswax to the fabric and repeat.
  • Once absorbed, remove the paper and carefully pick up the fabric with fingertips or tongs and gently swing to air and cool. I like to hang mine to air for a little while.
  • Don’t worry if there is excess wax on the paper, you can absorb it with your next piece of fabric, before placing more beeswax on top.
  • If your wrap can be screwed up into a ball and remain in the ball it is ready. If it unwraps itself, add more wax and repeat.
  • Repeat for however many wraps you want to make or products allow.

Method 2 – Beeswax & Coconut Oil

Follow the instructions above for fabric preparation

  • Prepare the area for the use of an iron. I used a thick towel covered with parchment/baking paper. Cut a 2nd piece of parchment/baking paper to fit the same area and bigger than the piece of fabric so no seeping onto the towel or iron.
  • Put iron on a medium to low setting
  • Place a piece of your cut fabric onto the paper
  • Cut or grate a small amount of the beeswax directly onto the fabric or if using pellets spread them onto the fabric.

Roughly 10g of beeswax 1/2 tsp of coconut oil for a handkerchief sized piece of fabric.

  • Cover the fabric & wax with the 2nd piece of parchment/baking paper.
  • Gently Iron over the area. The beeswax should melt easily into the fabric. (be careful no excess wax seeps out of the sides and onto your iron).
  • Remove iron and peel back the paper. The wax should have melted and soaked the fabric. If not fold the fabric onto itself with tongs or fingertips (being very careful it will be hot) then replace the paper over the top and heat again with the iron.
  • If too dry add more beeswax to the fabric and repeat.
  • Once absorbed, remove the paper and carefully pick up the fabric with fingertips or tongs and gently swing to air and cool. I like to hang mine to air for a little while.
  • Don’t worry if there is excess wax on the paper, you can absorb it with your next piece of fabric, before placing more beeswax on top.
  • If your wrap can be screwed up into a ball and remain in the ball it is ready. If it unwraps itself, add more wax and repeat.
  • Repeat for however many wraps you want to make or products allow.

Method 3 – Beeswax Jojoba Oil & Tree/Pine Resin

  • Follow the instructions above for fabric preparation

Using a double boiler or heat resistant vessel in a saucepan of hot water to the level of the mixture. Place the following mixture into the boiler/ dish within the pan. Over a low heat. Allow the mixture to melt together to a liquid (about 20 mins) giving it an occasional stir.

  • 35g Beeswax
  • 9g Pine Resin
  • 1 x Tablespoon Jojoba Oil

Meanwhile

  • Prepare the area for the use of an iron. I used a thick towel covered with parchment/baking paper. Cut a 2nd piece of parchment/baking paper to fit the same area and bigger than the piece of fabric so no seeping onto the towel or iron.
  • Put iron on a medium to low setting
  • Place a piece of your cut fabric onto the paper
  • Once melted, turn off the heat and with the paintbrush, brush the liquid over the fabric, giving good coverage.
  • Cover the fabric with the 2nd piece of parchment/baking paper.
  • Gently Iron over the area. The beeswax soak easily into the fabric. (be careful no excess wax seeps out of the sides and onto your iron).
  • Remove iron and peel back the paper. If there are any dry patches brush more melted wax onto the areas and repeat.
  • Once absorbed, remove the paper and carefully pick up the fabric with fingertips or tongs and gently swing to air and cool. I like to hang mine to air for a little while.
  • Don’t worry if there is excess wax on the paper, you can absorb it with your next piece of fabric, before placing more beeswax on top.
  • If your wrap can be screwed up into a ball and remain in the ball it is ready. If it unwraps itself, add more wax and repeat.
  • Repeat for however many wraps you want to make or products allow.

Other Heat Sources

Oven – Preheat to 300f/150c

You can use a baking tray covered in parchment/baking paper larger than your piece of fabric, allow about 2 -3 minutes cooking time. Recover dry patches with beeswax mixture.

Sandwich Press

A flat smooth sandwich press will work better. I would still use parchment/baking paper cut to size, otherwise you do have sticky residue. Otherwise the process is similar to the iron and heating from both sides, so likely to be quicker. (for any concerns check your manufacturers handbook before use).

Do You Need Pine Resin To Make Beeswax Wraps?

As you’ve seen above, it is possible to make the wraps without the pine resin, you will find that the resin gives a stickiness not unlike plastic wrap to the finished product, and be more like a purchased wrap. However, this doesn’t mean that the wraps without the resin won’t work.

Can You Make Beeswax Wraps With Just Beeswax?

You can, however they are likely to be very brittle and flaky. The oil, whether coconut or jojoba give the wrap its flexibility, and a better user experience.

How Long Do Beeswax Wraps Last ?

Depending on usage, but approximately 6 – 9 months. A general guide is, if its looking warn or no longer sticking, then its probably had its shelf life. Having said that, if it’s not functioning so well, you could redo the process again. Alternatively downgrade its use from food – see other uses here. Or as it is fully biodegradable pop it in your compost.

Sourcing Ingredients

You’ll find the best beeswax local to you, a local beekeeper, farmers markets and natural stores and of course online. One of the easiest forms to use is beeswax pellets as it can be hard to grate or cut blocks. Coconut oil is easily purchased in supermarkets or health food shops as is jojoba oil. Pine Resin if being used is harder to find, particularly from sustainable sources and organic. It’s more likely to be found online and can be found via amazon.

Other Posts You May Find Of Interest

What Are Beeswax / Reusable Wraps And Why Do I need them?

Gift Ideas That Keep On Giving

How To Create A Stylish Sustainable Wardrobe

7 Reasons Why You Should Make Your Own Soup

5 Instant Happiness Tips For a Bad Day

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